Trenching Can Be Done In An Environmentally Responsible Way

Trenching Can Be Done In An Environmentally Responsible Way

Australians have long had a love-hate relationship with the mining industry. We appreciated and profited from the revenue and jobs it generated, while at the same time, despaired over the damage indiscriminate mining practices caused to our fragile environment. Thankfully, modern techniques have reduced mining’s impact while generating economic activity.

Code of Environmental Practice to Guide Member Companies

One of the many activities needed to prepare a site and conduct on-going work is trenching, and it is also an activity that has improved, in terms of both productivity and being eco-friendly. Instructions on trenching practices are included in the Code of Environmental Practice published by the Australian Pipeline Industry Association, so all member companies take the information in the code seriously.

Reay Services Group is an Association member, so we are very familiar with this code, and the key environmental issues we need to address during the trenching process. We provide a range of track trenching machines for projects within both Queensland and the Australasia region.

Management Measures Available to Address Environmental Issues

In any of the projects we work on, we are likely to be addressing environmental issues such as soil erosion, contaminated soil, keeping stock and wildlife away from open trenches, potential impact to ground and surface water, amongst others. The code sets out the management measures to be taken to address these issues while acting in accordance with the environmental objectives that are also described in the code.

Modern Trenching Machines Better for the Environment

Of course, it helps if we have machines that can do the work required without adversely impacting on the environment. For example, our fleet includes terrain levellers that deliver increased production rates without the need for drilling and blasting. This is a much kinder and more environmentally responsible method of moving earth than blowing it up.

Reduced Carbon Footprint

As our trenching machines cut into the earth, they granulate the excavated material, which is then used as backfill, so the soil is not removed out of its area of origin. The machines themselves are 15 times more productive than excavators; they require less servicing and consume less fuel, thus reducing the carbon footprint of the entire project. There is less environmental impact and less overall ground disturbance.

Work Practices Align with Six Environmental Objectives

We align our work practices with the six environmental objectives mentioned earlier that apply specifically to trenching. We are confident we are doing everything we can to minimise the impact of our operations on the soil, water, stock and wildlife, heritage sites and disruption to the operations of other land users. By doing the right thing, there is opportunity for us to contribute to the economy and earn the trust of the public at the same time.

Australians have long had a love-hate relationship with the mining industry. We appreciated and profited from the revenue and jobs it generated, while at the same time, despaired over the damage indiscriminate mining practices caused to our fragile environment. Thankfully, modern techniques have reduced mining’s impact while generating economic activity.

Code of Environmental Practice to Guide Member Companies

One of the many activities needed to prepare a site and conduct on-going work is trenching, and it is also an activity that has improved, in terms of both productivity and being eco-friendly. Instructions on trenching practices are included in the Code of Environmental Practice published by the Australian Pipeline Industry Association, so all member companies take the information in the code seriously.

Reay Services Group is an Association member, so we are very familiar with this code, and the key environmental issues we need to address during the trenching process. We provide a range of track trenching machines for projects within both Queensland and the Australasia region.

Management Measures Available to Address Environmental Issues

In any of the projects we work on, we are likely to be addressing environmental issues such as soil erosion, contaminated soil, keeping stock and wildlife away from open trenches, potential impact to ground and surface water, amongst others. The code sets out the management measures to be taken to address these issues while acting in accordance with the environmental objectives that are also described in the code.

Modern Trenching Machines Better for the Environment

Of course, it helps if we have machines that can do the work required without adversely impacting on the environment. For example, our fleet includes terrain levellers that deliver increased production rates without the need for drilling and blasting. This is a much kinder and more environmentally responsible method of moving earth than blowing it up.

Reduced Carbon Footprint

As our trenching machines cut into the earth, they granulate the excavated material, which is then used as backfill, so the soil is not removed out of its area of origin. The machines themselves are 15 times more productive than excavators; they require less servicing and consume less fuel, thus reducing the carbon footprint of the entire project. There is less environmental impact and less overall ground disturbance.

Work Practices Align with Six Environmental Objectives

We align our work practices with the six environmental objectives mentioned earlier that apply specifically to trenching. We are confident we are doing everything we can to minimise the impact of our operations on the soil, water, stock and wildlife, heritage sites and disruption to the operations of other land users. By doing the right thing, there is opportunity for us to contribute to the economy and earn the trust of the public at the same time.

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